Posted On:December 2017 - AppFerret

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The Root Cause of IoT Skepticism

2017-12-28 - By 

It’s healthy to be skeptical of new ideas, but let’s take a look at the philosophy that might be holding back the biggest advancement in technology in a century.

In about exactly 13 years (target as set by NASA) or rather 7 years (as set by Elon Musk’s Space-X) from now, we humans are going to set foot on Mars and become a truly space-faring race.

We live in pretty exciting times riding on a threshold of Continuous Imagination empowering Continuous Innovation. Every product in every domain is undergoing a sea change, adding new features, releasing them faster than their competitors, adapting to incremental rate of technological substitution. But most of these new feature improvements and product launches are not guided by new requirements from customers. In the face of stiff competition that gets stiffer by the day, evolution and adaptation is the only natural process of survival and winning. As Charles Darwin would put it, it’s, “Survival of the fittest.”

But as history suggests, there are and there always will be skeptics among us who will doubt every action that deviates from convention – like those who doubt climate change, the need to explore the unexplored, and the need to change.

A human mind exposed to scientific education exhibits skepticism and pragmatism over dogmatism and largely remains technology-agonistic. It validates everything agnostically with knowledge and reasoning before accepting new ideas. But human progress always comes from philosophical insights — imaginations that led to the discovery or invention of new things. Technological progress has only turned science fiction (read: philosophy) into scientific facts.

With the above premises in mind, in this article, we intend to explore the realm of IoT, its implications on our lives, and our own limitations in foreseeing the imminent future as companies and customers.

We Understand the Internet, but not IoT

IoT, the Internet of Things (or Objects), denote the entire network of Internet-connected devices – vehicles, home and office appliances, and machinery equipment embedded with electronics, software, sensors, actuators, and the wired/Wi-Fi and RFID network connectivity that enable these objects to connect and exchange data. The benefits of this new ubiquitous connectivity will be reaped by everyone, and we will, for the first time, be able to hear and feel the heartbeat of the Earth.

For example, as cows, pigs, water pipes, people, and even shoes, trees, and animals become connected to IoT, farmers will have greater control over diseases affecting milk and meat production through the availability of real-time data and analytics. It is estimated that, on average, each connected cow will generate around 200 MB of data every month.

According to Cisco, back in 2003, the penetration of the Internet and connected devices per person was really low — but that grew at an exponential rate, doubling after every 5.32 years. That’s similar to the properties of Moore’s Law. Between 2008 and 2009, with the advent of smartphones, these figures rocketed, and it was predicted that 50 billion connected devices shall be in use by the year 2020. Thus, IoT was born and is in its adolescent phase already.

 

Today, IoT is well underway, as seen in initiatives such as Cisco’s Planetary Skin, smart grid, and intelligent vehicles, HP’s central nervous system for the earth (CeNSE), and smart dust, have the potential to add millions — even billions — of sensors to the Internet.

But just like as in during the social media explosion, the new age of IoT, connected devices, connected machines, connected cars, connected patients, connected consumers, and connected networks of Things we will need new age collaboration tools, new software, new database technologies, and infrastructure to accommodate, store and analyze huge amounts of data that will be generated — like the host of emerging technologies including graph databases, Big Data, microservices, and so on.

But that’s not all.

The Internet of Things will also require IOE – Integration of Everything — for meaningful interaction between devices and provides.

But as Kai Wähner of TIBCO discusses in his presentation “Microservices: Death of the Enterprise Service Bus,” microservices and API-led connectivity are ideally matched to meet integration challenges in the foreseeable future. MuleSoft’s “Anypoint Platform for APIs” backed by Cisco, Bosch’s “IoT platform,” or the upcoming API management suite from Kovair is a pointer to all this and shall empower the IoT revolution.

The explosion of connected devices — each requiring a specific IP address — already exhausted what was available in 2010 under IPv4 and required IPv6’s implementation immediately. In addition to opening up more IP addresses, IPv6 will also suffice for intra-planetary communication for a much longer period. Governments and the World Wide Web Consortium have remained laggards and skeptical with IPv6 implementation and allowed the exhaustion of IP addresses.

But it hasn’t been just governments. Bureaucratic and large, technology-driven organizations like Amazon, Google, and Facebook can remain skeptics under disguise and continue to block movements like Net Neutrality/ ZeroNet, Blockchain technology, IPFS (Inter Planetary File Sharing protocol), the overly cumbersome HTTP as they fear their monopolies will be challenged.

Conclusion

We humans, engaged in different capacities as company executives, consumers, government officials, or technology evangelists, are facing the debate of skepticism vs. futurism and will continue to doubt IoT — embracing it only incrementally until we see true, widespread benefits from it.

And we can see how our skepticism has worked against recognition and advancement.

After remaining skeptical for 120 years, the IEEE finally recognized the pioneering work done in by the Indian Physicist J.C. Bose during colonial rule and conferred on him the designation of the “Father of Telecommunication”. The mm wavelength frequency that he invented in his experiment in 1895 in Kolkata is the foundation of 5G (Wi-Fi Mobile network) that scientists and technologists across the world are now trying to reinvent that will provide the backbone for IoT.

Finally, we leave it to the reader’s imagination about the not-so-distant future, when all the connected devices in IoT begin to pass the Turing Test.

 

Original article here.

 


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70 Amazing Free Data Sources You Should Know

2017-12-20 - By 

70 free data sources for 2017 on government, crime, health, financial and economic data, marketing and social media, journalism and media, real estate, company directory and review, and more to start working on your data projects.

Every great data visualization starts with good and clean data. Most of people believe that collecting big data would be a rough thing, but it’s simply not true. There are thousands of free data sets available online, ready to be analyzed and visualized by anyone. Here we’ve rounded up 70 free data sources for 2017 on government, crime, health, financial and economic data,marketing and social media, journalism and media, real estate, company directory and review, and more.

We hope you could enjoy this and save a lot time and energy searching blindly online.

Free Data Source: Government

  1. Data.gov: It is the first stage and acts as a portal to all sorts of amazing information on everything from climate to crime freely by the US Government.
  2. Data.gov.uk: There are datasets from all UK central departments and a number of other public sector and local authorities. It acts as a portal to all sorts of information on everything, including business and economy, crime and justice, defence, education, environment, government, health, society and transportation.
  3. US. Census Bureau: The website is about the government-informed statistics on the lives of US citizens including population, economy, education, geography, and more.
  4. The CIA World Factbook: Facts on every country in the world; focuses on history, government, population, economy, energy, geography, communications, transportation, military, and transnational issues of 267 countries.
  5. Socrata: Socratais a mission-driven software company that is another interesting place to explore government-related data with some visualization tools built-in. Its data as a service has been adopted by more than 1200 government agencies for open data, performance management and data-driven government.
  6. European Union Open Data Portal: It is the single point of access to a growing range of data from the institutions and other bodies of the European Union. The data boosts includes economic development within the EU and transparency within the EU institutions, including geographic, geopolitical and financial data, statistics, election results, legal acts, and data on crime, health, the environment, transport and scientific research. They could be reused in different databases and reports. And more, a variety of digital formats are available from the EU institutions and other EU bodies. The portal provides a standardised catalogue, a list of apps and web tools reusing these data, a SPARQL endpoint query editor and rest API access, and tips on how to make best use of the site.
  7. Canada Open Datais a pilot project with many government and geospatial datasets. It could help you explore how the Government of Canada creates greater transparency, accountability, increases citizen engagement, and drives innovation and economic opportunities through open data, open information, and open dialogue.
  8. Datacatalogs.org: It offers open government data from US, EU, Canada, CKAN, and more.
  9. U.S. National Center for Education Statistics: The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations.
  10. UK Data Service: The UK Data Service collection includes major UK government-sponsored surveys, cross-national surveys, longitudinal studies, UK census data, international aggregate, business data, and qualitative data.

Free Data Source: Crime

  1. Uniform Crime Reporting: The UCR Program has been the starting place for law enforcement executives, students, researchers, members of the media, and the public seeking information on crime in the US.
  2. FBI Crime Statistics: Statistical crime reports and publications detailing specific offenses and outlining trends to understand crime threats at both local and national levels.
  3. Bureau of Justice Statistics: Information on anything related to U.S. justice system, including arrest-related deaths, census of jail inmates, national survey of DNA crime labs, surveys of law enforcement gang units, etc.
  4. National Sex Offender Search: It is an unprecedented public safety resource that provides the public with access to sex offender data nationwide. It presents the most up-to-date information as provided by each Jurisdiction.

Free Data Source: Health

  1. U.S. Food & Drug Administration: Here you will find a compressed data file of the Drugs@FDA database. Drugs@FDA, is updated daily, this data file is updated once per week, on Tuesday.
  2. UNICEF: UNICEF gathers evidence on the situation of children and women around the world. The data sets include accurate, nationally representative data from household surveys and other sources.
  3. World Health Organisation:  statistics concerning nutrition, disease and health in more than 150 countries.
  4. Healthdata.gov: 125 years of US healthcare data including claim-level Medicare data, epidemiology and population statistics.
  5. NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre: Health data sets from the UK National Health Service. The organization produces more than 260 official and national statistical publications. This includes national comparative data for secondary uses, developed from the long-running Hospital Episode Statistics which can help local decision makers to improve the quality and efficiency of frontline care.

Free Data Source: Financial and Economic Data

  1. World Bank Open Data: Education statistics about everything from finances to service delivery indicators around the world.
  2. IMF Economic Data: An incredibly useful source of information that includes global financial stability reports, regional economic reports, international financial statistics, exchange rates, directions of trade, and more.
  3. UN Comtrade Database: Free access to detailed global trade data with visualizations. UN Comtrade is a repository of official international trade statistics and relevant analytical tables. All data is accessible through API.
  4. Global Financial Data: With data on over 60,000 companies covering 300 years, Global Financial Data offers a unique source to analyze the twists and turns of the global economy.
  5. Google Finance: Real-time stock quotes and charts, financial news, currency conversions, or tracked portfolios.
  6. Google Public Data Explorer: Google’s Public Data Explorer provides public data and forecasts from a range of international organizations and academic institutions including the World Bank, OECD, Eurostat and the University of Denver. These can be displayed as line graphs, bar graphs, cross sectional plots or on maps.
  7. U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis: U.S. official macroeconomic and industry statistics, most notably reports about the gross domestic product (GDP) of the United States and its various units. They also provide information about personal income, corporate profits, and government spending in their National Income and Product Accounts (NIPAs).
  8. Financial Data Finder at OSU: Plentiful links to anything related to finance, no matter how obscure, including World Development Indicators Online, World Bank Open Data, Global Financial Data, International Monetary Fund Statistical Databases, and EMIS Intelligence.
  9. National Bureau of Economic Research: Macro data, industry data, productivity data, trade data, international finance, data, and more.
  10. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission: Quarterly datasets of extracted information from exhibits to corporate financial reports filed with the Commission.
  11. Visualizing Economics: Data visualizations about the economy.
  12. Financial Times: The Financial Times provides a broad range of information, news and services for the global business community.

Free Data Source: Marketing and Social Media

  1. Amazon API: Browse Amazon Web Services’Public Data Sets by category for a huge wealth of information. Amazon API Gateway allows developers to securely connect mobile and web applications to APIs that run on Amazon Web(AWS) Lambda, Amazon EC2, or other publicly addressable web services that are hosted outside of AWS.
  2. American Society of Travel Agents: ASTA is the world’s largest association of travel professionals. It provides members information including travel agents and the companies whose products they sell such as tours, cruises, hotels, car rentals, etc.
  3. Social Mention: Social Mention is a social media search and analysis platform that aggregates user-generated content from across the universe into a single stream of information.
  4. Google Trends: Google Trends shows how often a particular search-term is entered relative to the total search-volume across various regions of the world in various languages.
  5. Facebook API: Learn how to publish to and retrieve data from Facebook using the Graph API.
  6. Twitter API: The Twitter Platform connects your website or application with the worldwide conversation happening on Twitter.
  7. Instagram API: The Instagram API Platform can be used to build non-automated, authentic, high-quality apps and services.
  8. Foursquare API: The Foursquare API gives you access to our world-class places database and the ability to interact with Foursquare users and merchants.
  9. HubSpot: A large repository of marketing data. You could find the latest marketing stats and trends here. It also provides tools for social media marketing, content management, web analytics, landing pages and search engine optimization.
  10. Moz: Insights on SEO that includes keyword research, link building, site audits, and page optimization insights in order to help companies to have a better view of the position they have on search engines and how to improve their ranking.
  11. Content Marketing Institute: The latest news, studies, and research on content marketing.

Free Data Source: Journalism and Media

  1. The New York Times Developer Network– Search Times articles from 1851 to today, retrieving headlines, abstracts and links to associated multimedia. You can also search book reviews, NYC event listings, movie reviews, top stories with images and more.
  2. Associated Press API: The AP Content API allows you to search and download content using your own editorial tools, without having to visit AP portals. It provides access to images from AP-owned, member-owned and third-party, and videos produced by AP and selected third-party.
  3. Google Books Ngram Viewer: It is an online search engine that charts frequencies of any set of comma-delimited search strings using a yearly count of n-grams found in sources printed between 1500 and 2008 in Google’s text corpora.
  4. Wikipedia Database: Wikipedia offers free copies of all available content to interested users.
  5. FiveThirtyEight: It is a website that focuses on opinion poll analysis, politics, economics, and sports blogging. The data and code on Github is behind the stories and interactives at FiveThirtyEight.
  6. Google Scholar: Google Scholar is a freely accessible web search engine that indexes the full text or metadata of scholarly literature across an array of publishing formats and disciplines. It includes most peer-reviewed online academic journals and books, conference papers, theses and dissertations, preprints, abstracts, technical reports, and other scholarly literature, including court opinions and patents.

Free Data Source: Real Estate

  1. Castles: Castles are a successful, privately owned independent agency. Established in 1981, they offer a comprehensive service incorporating residential sales, letting and management, and surveys and valuations.
  2. Realestate.comRealEstate.com serves as the ultimate resource for first-time home buyers, offering easy-to-understand tools and expert advice at every stage in the process.
  3. Gumtree: Gumtree is the first site for free classifieds ads in the UK. Buy and sell items, cars, properties, and find or offer jobs in your area is all available on the website.
  4. James Hayward: It provides an innovative database approach to residential sales, lettings & management.
  5. Lifull Homes: Japan’s property website.
  6. Immobiliare.it: Italy’s property website.
  7. Subito: Italy’s property website.
  8. Immoweb: Belgium’s leading property website.

Free Data Source: Business Directory and Review

  1. LinkedIn: LinkedIn is a business- and employment-oriented social networking service that operates via websites and mobile apps. It has 500 million members in 200 countries and you could find the business directory here.
  2. OpenCorporates: OpenCorporates is the largest open database of companies and company data in the world, with in excess of 100 million companies in a similarly large number of jurisdictions. Our primary goal is to make information on companies more usable and more widely available for the public benefit, particularly to tackle the use of companies for criminal or anti-social purposes, for example corruption, money laundering and organised crime.
  3. Yellowpages: The original source to find and connect with local plumbers, handymen, mechanics, attorneys, dentists, and more.
  4. Craigslist: Craigslist is an American classified advertisements website with sections devoted to jobs, housing, personals, for sale, items wanted, services, community, gigs, résumés, and discussion forums.
  5. GAF Master Elite Contractor: Founded in 1886, GAF has become North America’s largest manufacturer of commercial and residential roofing (Source: Fredonia Group study). Our success in growing the company to nearly $3 billion in sales has been a result of our relentless pursuit of quality, combined with industry-leading expertise and comprehensive roofing solutions. Jim Schnepper is the President of GAF, an operating subsidiary of Standard Industries. When you are looking to protect the things you treasure most, here are just some of the reasons why we believe you should choose GAF.
  6. CertainTeed: You could find contractors, remodelers, installers or builders in the US or Canada on your residential or commercial project here.
  7. Companies in California: All information about companies in California.
  8. Manta: Manta is one of the largest online resources that deliver products, services and educational opportunities. The Manta directory boasts millions of unique visitors every month who search comprehensive database for individual businesses, industry segments and geographic-specific listings.
  9. EU-Startups: Directory about startups in EU.
  10. Kansas Bar Association: Directory for lawyers. The Kansas Bar Association (KBA) was founded in 1882 as a voluntary association for dedicated legal professionals and has more than 7,000 members, including lawyers, judges, law students, and paralegals.

Free Data Source: Other Portal Websites

  1. Capterra: Directory about business software and reviews.
  2. Monster: Data source for jobs and career opportunities.
  3. Glassdoor: Directory about jobs and information about inside scoop on companies with employee reviews, personalized salary tools, and more.
  4. The Good Garage Scheme: Directory about car service, MOT or car repair.
  5. OSMOZ: Information about fragrance.
  6. Octoparse: A free data extraction tool to collect all the web data mentioned above online.

Do you know some great data sources? Contact to let us know and help us share the data love.

More Related Sources:

Top 30 Big Data Tools for Data Analysis

Top 30 Free Web Scraping Software

 

Original article here.

 


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The Internet of Insecure Things

2017-12-14 - By 

From home appliances to health applications and security solutions, everything we use at home – and outside of it, is getting connected to the Internet, becoming the Internet of Things (IoT). Think about how many connected devices you have at home: tablets, laptops, e-readers, fitness devices, smart TVs – how about your thermostat, light bulbs, refrigerator and security system? Our home has effectively become a connected home, with an average of 12 things connecting to our home Wi-Fi network, transmitting data and delivering added value. But as connected home appliances continue to grow, so too will the cybersecurity risks.

Consumers have been fast to adopt IoT devices on the promise that they can improve our lifestyles. These things track and optimize our energy consumption, facilitate our daily tasks, improve our health and wellness, keep us secure and empower us with the freedom and data to do other things better. But from a security point of view, this unregulated, insecure and fragmented market represents a clear and present danger to individuals and society as a whole, from the cyber to the physical realm.

To protect connected homes, a multi-faceted approach is recommended, combining a firewall blocking mechanism with machine learning and artificial intelligence to detect network anomalies. Millions of IoT devices are already compromised and we recommend communication service providers (CSPs) to initiate deployment of cybersecurity solutions today in parallel to their own R&D plans. By providing cybersecurity solutions through partnerships, they can begin to protect their vulnerable clients today and establish a market leadership position.

Cyber-threats

The declining costs to manufacture chips that can store and transmit data through a network connection have enabled thousands of organizations and startups to bring IoT products to market. But the current lack of standards and security certifications, coupled with fierce market competition to deliver affordable IoT products, have made cybersecurity an expense that manufacturers prefer others to deal with.

The lack of experience and incentives in the IoT supply chain to provide secure devices has created a tremendously vulnerable IoT landscape. In fact, according to recent findings by Symantec, IoT devices can become compromised within two minutes of connecting to the Internet1. Legislation has been too slow to deal with the current threat, and although there are public initiatives to drive cyber awareness among consumers, we do not expect any tangible changes soon.

There are many attack vectors and vulnerabilities to worry about in the Connected Home. From poor design decisions and hard-coded passwords to coding flaws, everything with an IP address is a potential backdoor to cyber crimes. Traditional cybersecurity companies reacted slowly and failed to provide defense solutions to the expanding universe of IoT devices. However, novel approaches with Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning – such as analyzing and understanding network behaviors to detect anomalies, are now available to defend against these new threats.

With all its challenges and opportunities, consumer IoT is destined to disrupt long-established industries, making it a space one cannot afford to ignore. One such long-established industry is precisely the one powering the revolution: the CSPs providing the broadband. By and large, telecommunication companies have failed to monetize the data running through their home gateways, missing out in big opportunities. We believe that the connected home, especially cybersecurity, is a low-hanging fruit that communication service providers can and should pick before it’s too late.

Home security and safety-related appliances are top revenue drivers in the connected home landscape, and telecom companies are well positioned to enter this market and rebrand themselves as innovative and secure companies interested in the well-being and privacy of their customers. By leveraging their existing assets, such as the home router, telecoms can provide holistic solutions that include cybersecurity, data management and customer support – giving them a unique advantage over their competitors. Consumers would much rather trust their CSPs to continue managing their data than giving it away to foreign or unknown companies. It is time for Internet Service Providers to reclaim their value as a Service Provider, else they risk missing out in this revolution as broadband continues to become commoditized.

Stories of hacked IoT devices abound, a quick search online will lead you to scary stories, from spying Barbie dolls2, to TV sets monitoring you3 and creeps accessing baby cameras4. Most ironic and worrying of all are the security threats inherent in best-selling security systems, which can allow hackers to control the whole system, due to lack of encryption and sufficient cybersecurity standards5.

The cyber and physical risks intensify the more devices we connect: The volume of granular data that all these connected things generate when combined can provide a very detailed profile of the user, which can be used for identity theft and blackmail.

Once an unprotected IoT device gets hacked, a skilled hacker can proceed to infect other devices in the network via “lateral movement”. By jumping from one device to another, a hacker can gain complete control of a connected home. Because this threat comes from within the network, it is important to have a security solution that provides network visibility, creates device profiles and detects anomalies through machine learning and artificial intelligence.

There have been enough stories in the news for the average consumer to be aware of cyber threats, they know security is important and that they don’t have it, but they lack the resources to properly protect themselves. IoT manufacturers should be held accountable to prioritize security, but until that happens, the responsibility and opportunity falls on CSPs to protect the consumers.

Structural Risks

What makes the IoT ecosystem a potentially deadly cyber threat is the combined computing and networking power of thousands of devices which, when operated together as a botnet, can execute massive Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks and shut down large swaths of the Internet through a fire hose of junk traffic. The IoT ecosystem represents a totally different level of complexity and scale in terms of security and privacy.

In October 2016, we got a taste of this structural risk when the infamous Mirai botnet attacked the DNS company Dyn with the biggest DDoS attack ever reported: more than 1 terabit per second (Tbps) flooded the service, temporarily blocking access to Netflix, Twitter, Amazon, PayPal, SoundCloud, New York Times and others. The Mirai botnet used enslaved IoT devices -nearly 150,000 hacked cameras, routers and smart appliances, to inadvertently do its criminal bidding, and most of the infected devices remain out there, with their users oblivious to the fact.

The way Mirai malware spreads and attacks is well known: it scans the web for open Telnet and SSH ports, browsing for vulnerable devices using factory default or hard-coded usernames and passwords, then uses an encrypted tunnel to communicate between the devices and command and control (C&C) servers that send instructions to them. Since Mirai uses encrypted traffic, it prevents security researchers from monitoring the command and data traffic.

The source code for Mirai was posted soon after on the Hackforums site6, enabling other criminals to create their own strains of the malware. It is not necessary to have an “army” of thousands of infected devices to cause harm. Mini-DDoS botnets, with hundreds of compromised nodes, are sufficient to cause temporary structural damage and reduce the chances of getting caught -expect more of these attacks in the future.

Capturing vulnerable devices to turn them into botnets has become a cyber crime gold rush, with an estimated 4000 vulnerable IoT devices becoming active each day7, and criminals selling and renting botnets in the dark net at competitive prices to cause harm. Although simple to understand, this sort of malware is hard to detect because it does not generally affect device performance, so the average user cannot know if their device is part of a botnet – and even if they did, it’s often difficult to interact with IoT devices without a user interface.

Stakeholders should take proactive steps that can prevent future incidents by addressing the lack of security-by-design in the IoT landscape. The Mirai malware was a warning shot, and organizations must be prepared for larger and potentially more devastating attacks. Because of market failures at play, regulation seems like the only way forward to incentivize device manufacturers to implement security in their design, but doing so could stifle innovation and prove disastrous to the ecosystem. It is because of this delicate balance that we believe service providers are perfectly positioned to seize this problem as an opportunity to become market leaders in the emerging field of IoT cybersecurity.

Looking Forward

The frequency of cyber threats is increasing as the IoT landscape continues to expand. Gartner predicts that by 2020, addressing compromises in IoT security will have increased security costs to 20% of annual security budgets, from less than one percent in 20158. The threats to consumers and society are numerous, but joint cybersecurity and cyber-hygiene efforts by manufacturers, legislators, service providers and end users, will mitigate the inherent risks discussed in this paper.

Until that happens, service providers are uniquely positioned and encouraged to begin offering cybersecurity services to their consumers through their home gateways: the main door of the home network. Communication Service Providers that provide home network security and management solutions today can become the preferred brand for Smart Home solutions and appliances, leading IoT market adoption while preventing the cyber risks associated with it.

Netonomy has developed a solution that is available today for service providers interested in providing a layer of security to their consumers and become a trusted market leader in the emerging IoT landscape. Because it is cloud-based, this solution can be instantly deployed across thousands of routers at a low cost and bring immediate peace of mind to consumers.

Netonomy’s Solution:
Netonomy provides a simple, reliable and secure network for the connected home. Through a minimal-footprint agent installed on the home router, we provide a holistic solution to manage the connected home network and protect it from internal and external security threats. Our unique technology can be deployed on virtually all the existing home gateways quickly and at a minimal cost, providing ISPs and router manufacturers with better visibility into home networks and a premium service that can be sold to customers to make their connected future simple, reliable and secure.
Original article here.

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Why 2018 Will be The Year of AI

2017-12-13 - By 

Artificial Intelligence, more commonly known as AI, isn’t a new topic and has been around for years; however, those who have tracked its’ progress have noted that 2017 is the year that has seen it accelerate than years previously.  This hot topic has made its’ way into the media, in boardrooms and within the government.  One reason for this is things that haven’t functioned for decades has suddenly began to work; this is going beyond embedded functions or just tools and expectations are high for 2018.

There are several reasons why this year has recorded the most progress when working with AI.  Before going into these four preconditions that allowed AI to progress over the past five years, it is important to understand what Artificial Intelligence means.  Then, we can take a closer look at each of the four preconditions and how they will shape what is to come next year.

What is Artificial Intelligence?

Basically, Artificial Intelligence is defined as the science of making computers do things that require intelligence when done by humans.  However, five decades have gone by since AI was born and progress in the field has moved very slowly; this has created a level of appreciation to the profound difficulty of this problem.  Fortunately, this year has seen considerable progress and has opened the probability of further advancement in 2018.

Preconditions That Allowed AI to Succeed in 2017 and Beyond

Everything is presently becoming connected with our devices, such as being able to start a project on your Desktop PC and then able to finish your work on a connected smartphone or tablet.  Ray Kurzweil believes that eventually, humans will be able to use sensors that connects our brains to the cloud.  Since the internet originally connected to computers and has advanced to connecting to our mobile devices, sensors that already enable buildings, homes and even our clothes to be linked to the internet can in our near future expand to be used to connect our minds into the cloud.

Another component for AI becoming more advanced is due to computing becoming freer to use.  Previously, it would be costly for new chips to come out during an eighteen-month-period at twice the speed; however, Marc Andreessen claims that new chips are being processed at the same speed but only at half of the cost.  The theory is that the future will see inexpensive processors at an inexpensive price so that a processor will be in everything; computing capacity will be able to solve problems that had no solution five years prior.

Another component for the advancement of AI is that data is becoming the new oil, which has been made available digitally over the past decade.  Since data can be retrieved through our mobile devices and can be tracked through sensors, new sources of data have appeared through video, social media and digital images.  Conditions that could only be modeled at an elevated level in the past can now be described more accurately due to the almost infinite set of real data that is available; this means accuracy will increase more soon.

Finally, the fourth component that has contributed towards AI advancement is that machine learning is transforming into the new combustion engine as it is accomplished through using mathematical models and algorithms to discover patterns that are implicit in data.  These complex patterns are used by machines to solve on their own whether a new data is similar, that it fits or can be used to predict future outcomes.  Virtual assistants use AI, such as Siri and Cortana, to solve equations and predict outcomes every day with great accuracy; virtual assistants will continue to be used in 2018 and beyond as well as what they will be able to accomplish the more AI continues to grow and evolve.

Artificial Intelligence has seen much improvements than in previous decades.  This year, many experts were amazed and excited about how AI has progressed from the many decades since its’ birth.  Now, we can expect 2018 to see advancements in work, school and possibly in self-driving cars that can result in up to ninety percent fewer car accidents; welcome to the future of Artificial Intelligence.

Original article here.


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