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Microsoft has acquired GitHub for $7.5B in stock

2018-06-04 - By 

After a week of rumors, Microsoft  today confirmed that it has acquired GitHubthe popular Git-based code sharing and collaboration service. The price of the acquisition was $7.5 billion in Microsoft stock. GitHub raised $350 million and we know that the company was valued at about $2 billion in 2015.

Former Xamarin CEO Nat Friedman (and now Microsoft corporate vice president) will become GitHub’s CEO. GitHub founder and former CEO Chris Wanstrath will become a Microsoft technical fellow and work on strategic software initiatives. Wanstrath had retaken his CEO role after his co-founder Tom Preston-Werner resigned following a harassment investigation in 2014.

The fact that Microsoft is installing a new CEO for GitHub is a clear sign that the company’s approach to integrating GitHub will be similar to hit it is working with LinkedIn. “GitHub will retain its developer-first ethos and will operate independently to provide an open platform for all developers in all industries,” a Microsoft spokesperson told us.

GitHub says that as of March 2018, there were 28 million developers in its community, and 85 million code repositories, making it the largest host of source code globally and a cornerstone of how many in the tech world build software.

But despite its popularity with enterprise users, individual developers and open source projects, GitHub has never turned a profit and chances are that the company decided that an acquisition was preferable over trying to IPO.

GitHub’s main revenue source today is paid accounts, which allows for private repositories and a number of other features that enterprises need, with pricing ranging from $7 per user per month to $21/user/month. Those building public and open source projects can use it for free.

While numerous large enterprises use GitHub as their code sharing service of choice, it also faces quite a bit of competition in this space thanks to products like GitLab and Atlassian’s Bitbucket, as well as a wide range of other enterprise-centric code hosting tools.

Microsoft is acquiring GitHub because it’s a perfect fit for its own ambitions to be the go-to platform for every developer, and every developer need, no matter the platform.

Microsoft has long embraced the Git protocol and is using it in its current Visual Studio Team Services product, which itself used to compete with GitHub’s enterprise service. Knowing GitHub’s position with developers, Microsoft has also leaned on the service quite a bit itself, too and some in the company already claim it is the biggest contributor to GitHub today.

Yet while Microsoft’s stance toward open source has changed over the last few years, many open source developers will keep a very close look at what the company will do with GitHub after the acquisition. That’s because there is a lot of distrust of Microsoft in this cohort, which is understandable given Microsoft’s history.

In fact, TechCrunch received a tip on Friday, which noted not only that the deal had already closed, but that open source software maintainers were already eyeing up alternatives and looking potentially to abandon GitHub in the wake of the deal. Some developers (not just those working in open source) were not wasting timeeven to wait for a confirmation of the deal before migrating.

While GitHub is home to more than just open source software, if such a migration came to pass, it would be a very bad look both for GitHub and Microsoft. And, it would a particularly ironic turn, given the very origins of Git: the versioning control system was created by Linus Torvalds in 2005 when he was working on development of the Linux kernel, in part as a response to a previous system, BitKeeper, changing its terms away from being free to use.

The new Microsoft under CEO Satya Nadella strikes us as a very different company from the Microsoft of ten years ago — especially given that the new Microsoft has embraced open source — but it’s hard to forget its earlier history of trying to suppress Linux.

“Microsoft is a developer-first company, and by joining forces with GitHub we strengthen our commitment to developer freedom, openness and innovation,” said Nadella in today’s announcement. “We recognize the community responsibility we take on with this agreement and will do our best work to empower every developer to build, innovate and solve the world’s most pressing challenges.”

Yet at the same time, it’s worth remembering that Microsoft is now a member of the Linux Foundation and regularly backs a number of open source projects. And Windows now has the Linux subsystem while VS Code, the company’s free code editing tool is open source and available on GitHub, as are .NET Core and numerous other Microsoft-led projects.

And many in the company were defending Microsoft’s commitment to GitHub and its principles, even before the deal was announced.

Still, you can’t help but wonder how Microsoft might leverage GitHub within its wider business strategy, which could see the company build stronger bridges between GitHub and Azure, its cloud hosting service, and its wide array of software and collaboration products. Microsoft is no stranger to ingesting huge companies. One of them, LinkedIn, might be another area where Microsoft might explore synergies, specifically around areas like recruitment and online tutorials and education.

 

Original article here.

 


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Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP)

2018-01-18 - By 

Starting AMP from scratch is great, but what if you already have an existing site? Learn how you can convert your site to AMP using AMP HTML.

“What’s Allowed in AMP and What Isn’t”: https://goo.gl/ugMhHc

Tutorial on how to convert HTML to AMP: https://goo.gl/JwUVyG

Reach out with your AMP related questions: https://goo.gl/UxCWfz

Watch all Amplify episodes: https://goo.gl/B9CCl4

Subscribe to the The AMP Channel and never miss an Amplify episode: https://goo.gl/g2Y8h7

 

 

Original video here.


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Top 15 Python Libraries for Data Science in 2017

2017-06-18 - By 

As Python has gained a lot of traction in the recent years in Data Science industry, I wanted to outline some of its most useful libraries for data scientists and engineers, based on recent experience.

And, since all of the libraries are open sourced, we have added commits, contributors count and other metrics from Github, which could be served as a proxy metrics for library popularity.

 

Core Libraries.

1. NumPy (Commits: 15980, Contributors: 522)

When starting to deal with the scientific task in Python, one inevitably comes for help to Python’s SciPy Stack, which is a collection of software specifically designed for scientific computing in Python (do not confuse with SciPy library, which is part of this stack, and the community around this stack). This way we want to start with a look at it. However, the stack is pretty vast, there is more than a dozen of libraries in it, and we want to put a focal point on the core packages (particularly the most essential ones).

The most fundamental package, around which the scientific computation stack is built, is NumPy (stands for Numerical Python). It provides an abundance of useful features for operations on n-arrays and matrices in Python. The library provides vectorization of mathematical operations on the NumPy array type, which ameliorates performance and accordingly speeds up the execution.

 

2. SciPy (Commits: 17213, Contributors: 489)

SciPy is a library of software for engineering and science. Again you need to understand the difference between SciPy Stack and SciPy Library. SciPy contains modules for linear algebra, optimization, integration, and statistics. The main functionality of SciPy library is built upon NumPy, and its arrays thus make substantial use of NumPy. It provides efficient numerical routines as numerical integration, optimization, and many others via its specific submodules. The functions in all submodules of SciPy are well documented — another coin in its pot.

See the full article here.


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JavaScript framework Mithril focuses on performance, size, and density

2017-02-06 - By 

Mithril, an open source JavaScript framework for single-page applications, is looking to best Facebook’s React, Google’s Angular, and Vue JavaScript tools in performance and ease of use. It reached the 1.0.0 release stage last week.

The framework is small and fast, and it provides routing and XHR (XMLHttpRequest) out of the box. Mithril also offers benefits in relative density, lead developer Leo Horie said. “It’s possible to develop entire applications without resorting to other libraries, and it’s not uncommon for Mithril apps to weigh a third of other apps of similar complexity.” Horie said that the framework feels closer to vanilla JavaScript.

Mithril’s website features a comparison to Angular, React, and Vue. Mithril, for example, offers much quicker library load times and update performance than React, and it has a better learning curve and update performance than Angular. Compared to Vue, Mithril supposedly offers better library load times and update performance. Vue and Mithril both use virtual DOM and lifecycle methods, and both Angular and Mithril supporting componentization.

The framework hopes to make the learning curve for modern web development as low as possible with its API and tooling requirements. Plans for Mithril call for a continued focus on simplifying development workflow. “The v1.0.0 release is actually smaller in size than the previous releases, but I feel it’s still possible to simplify things more than the current status quo on the tooling side,” Horie said.

Original article here.


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