Why SQL is beating NoSQL, and what this means for the future of data

2018-03-29 - By 

After years of being left for dead, SQL today is making a comeback. How come? And what effect will this have on the data community?

Since the dawn of computing, we have been collecting exponentially growing amounts of data, constantly asking more from our data storage, processing, and analysis technology. In the past decade, this caused software developers to cast aside SQL as a relic that couldn’t scale with these growing data volumes, leading to the rise of NoSQL: MapReduce and Bigtable, Cassandra, MongoDB, and more.

Yet today SQL is resurging. All of the major cloud providers now offer popular managed relational database services: e.g., Amazon RDSGoogle Cloud SQLAzure Database for PostgreSQL (Azure launched just this year). In Amazon’s own words, its PostgreSQL- and MySQL-compatible database Aurora database product has been the “fastest growing service in the history of AWS”. SQL interfaces on top of Hadoop and Spark continue to thrive. And just last month, Kafka launched SQL support. Your humble authors themselves are developers of a new time-series database that fully embraces SQL.

In this post we examine why the pendulum today is swinging back to SQL, and what this means for the future of the data engineering and analysis community.


Part 1: A New Hope

To understand why SQL is making a comeback, let’s start with why it was designed in the first place.

Our story starts at IBM Research in the early 1970s, where the relational database was born. At that time, query languages relied on complex mathematical logic and notation. Two newly minted PhDs, Donald Chamberlin and Raymond Boyce, were impressed by the relational data model but saw that the query language would be a major bottleneck to adoption. They set out to design a new query language that would be (in their own words): “more accessible to users without formal training in mathematics or computer programming.”

Read the Full article here.

 

Site Search

Search
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in comments
Search in excerpt
Filter by Custom Post Type
 

BlogFerret

Help-Desk
X
Sign Up

Enter your email and Password

Log In

Enter your Username or email and password

Reset Password

Enter your email to reset your password

X
<-- script type="text/javascript">jQuery('#qt_popup_close').on('click', ppppop);